PLAGERISM WORKSHEET

PLAGERISM WORKSHEET

PLAGIARISM WORKSHEET

Instructions: Below is an original passage from a source followed by four passages that paraphrase the source. For each of the four passages, identify whether it is or is not plagiarism and briefly explain your answer.

Paraphrase #1

Rage can actually be a positive force in our lives. It can give us the energy and the courage to resist threats and take more control over lives than we ever imagined possible. But it’s also the emotion that our society distrusts the most, so we are taught early on to fear our own rage. But when children immerse themselves in imaginary battles and identify with violent heroes, they learn to confront their stifled rage, fear it less, and use it against the challenges they face in life.

Is this plagiarism? Why or why not?

Paraphrase #2 We are generally taught that rage is a negative and dangerous emotion that should be suppressed. But when we constantly suppress our rage, it eventually bubbles up in uncontrollable ways. If channeled properly, however, rage can be a positive force in our lives. “It can give us the energy and the courage to resist threats and take more control over lives than we ever imagined possible.”

Is this plagiarism? Why or why not?

Original Source and Passage Jones, Gerard. “Violent Media is Good for Kids.” Perspectives on Contemporary Issues. 6th

ed. Katherine Anne Ackley. Boston: Wadsworth, 2011. 230-33. Print.

Rage can be an energizing emotion, a shot of courage to push us to resist greater threats, take more control, than we ever thought we could. But rage is also the emotion that our culture distrusts the most. Most of us are taught early on to fear our own. Through immersion in imaginary combat and identification with a violent protagonist, children engage the rage they’ve stifled, come to fear it less, and become more capable of utilizing it against life’s challenges. (232)

Paraphrase #3

We generally think of rage as a negative and dangerous emotion, but Gerard Jones points out that it can also be a “energizing emotion, a shot of courage to push us to resist greater threats, take more control, than we ever thought we could” (232). But, unfortunately, most of us are taught to fear and distrust our own rage. This is why many children choose to immerse themselves in imaginary combat and identification with violent protagonists. Through these strategies, children learn to engage the rage they’ve stifled, fear it less, and “utilize it against life’s challenges” (Jones 232).

Is this plagiarism? Why or why not?

Paraphrase #4 We are all aware of the negative, destructive impact that rage can have on our lives; but it is important that we also understand the positive side of rage. Rage can be a tremendous motivating force, and it can give us the courage to confront threats and take control of difficult situations. But society has taught us to suppress our rage, and many of us suffer for the lack of its benefits. This is why so many children immerse themselves in comic books and other violent media. By identifying with violent characters, they are able to come to grips with their own rage and, more often than not, channel it ways that help them meet the challenges that life presents.

Is this plagiarism? Why or why not?

Paraphrase #5 Modern society teaches us that rage is a dangerous and destructive emotion, and most of us have learned to suppress it as much as possible. But this attitude toward rage overlooks the ways in which it can act as a positive force in our lives. As Gerard Jones explains, “Rage can be an energizing emotion, a shot of courage to push us to resist greater threats, take more control, than we ever thought we could” (232). With no other acceptable way to confront their rage, many children turn to comic books and other media that allow them to identify with violent characters and play out violent fantasies. In this way, many children are able come to terms with their own rage, control it, and use it to overcome the many challenges that life presents (Jones 232).

Is this plagiarism? Why or why not?